Don't feed me that!

Posted by Theresa Goiffon on Friday, November 20, 2009 Under: Dog Health and Current News related topics
During this time of year, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, as we celebrate and feast on a variety of wonderful foods many, (guilty myself) tend to share a bit with our 4-legged friends.  While we think by giving our dogs "a special little treat" in celebration, it's really important for us to be reminded about what NOT to give them.

Here is something I pulled up on line that I thought would be a good reminder, some things like grapes and raisins, were new to me! If a grape of two roll off your plate and your dog goes for it, probably won't kill him, but if he eats a plate full, it could be very serious.

So, enjoy your Celebrations and share a piece of that turkey with your dogs, but use caution with other human treats.  Review the list below from the Animal Poison Control Center. You'll be surprised at some of the poisonous foods that are included.




Foods to Avoid Feeding Your Pet
- Alcoholic beverages
- Avocado
- Almonds
- Apricots
- Chocolate (all forms)
- Coffee (all forms)
- Fatty foods
- Macadamia nuts
- Moldy or spoiled foods
- Onions, onion powder
- Raisins and grapes
- Salt
- Yeast dough
- Garlic
- Products sweetened with xylitol
-Sugarless Candies

Toxins Explained

Chocolate/Caffeine
: Chocolate contains theobromine, a compound that is a cardiac stimulant and a diuretic. After their pet has eaten a large quantity of chocolate, many pet owners assume their pet is unaffected. However, the signs of sickness may not be seen for several hours, with death following within twenty-four hours. Symptoms include Staggering, labored breathing, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, tremors, fever, heart rate increase, arrhythmia, seizures, coma, death. Cocoa powder and cooking chocolate are the most toxic forms. A 10-kilogram dog can be seriously affected if it eats a quarter of a 250gm packet of cocoa powder or half of a 250gm block of cooking chocolate. These forms of chocolate contain ten times more theobromine than milk chocolate. Thus, a chocolate mud cake could be a real health risk for a small dog. Even licking a substantial part of the chocolate icing from a cake can make a dog unwell. Semi-sweet chocolate and dark chocolate are the next most dangerous forms, with milk chocolate being the least dangerous. A dog needs to eat more than a 250gm block of milk chocolate to be affected. Obviously, the smaller the dog, the less it needs to eat.

Onions/Garlic: Onions and garlic contain the toxic ingredient thiosulphate. Onions are more of a danger. Pets affected by onion toxicity will develop haemolytic anaemia, where the pet’s red blood cells burst while circulating in its body. Symptoms include Hemolytic Anemia, labored breathing, liver damage, vomiting, diarrhea, discolored urine. The poisoning occurs a few days after the pet has eaten the onion. All forms of onion can be a problem including dehydrated onions, raw onions, cooked onions and table scraps containing cooked onions and/or garlic. Left over pizza, Chinese dishes and commercial baby food containing onion, sometimes fed as a supplement to young pets, can cause illness. While garlic also contains the toxic ingredient thiosulphate, it seems that garlic is less toxic and large amounts would need to be eaten to cause illness.

Grapes/Raisins: As few as a handful of raisins or grapes can make a dog/cat ill; however, of the 10 cases reported to the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center (APCC), each dog ingested between 9 ounces and 2 pounds of grapes or raisins. Symptoms include vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, and lethargy.

Macadamia Nuts: Macadamia nuts are another concern, along with most other kinds of nuts. Their high phosphorus content is said to possibly lead to bladder stones. Dogs develop a tremor of the skeletal muscles, and weakness or paralysis of the hindquarters. Affected dogs are often unable to rise and are distressed, usually panting. Some affected dogs have swollen limbs and show pain when the limbs are manipulated.

Bones from fish, poultry, or other meat sources: Can cause obstruction or laceration of the digestive system. Cooked bones splinter EVEN MORE.

Milk and other dairy products: Some adult dogs and cats do not have sufficient amounts of the enzyme lactase, which breaks down the lactose in milk. This can result in diarrhea. Lactose-free milk products are available for pets.

Raw Eggs: Contain an enzyme called avidin, which decreases the absorption of biotin (a B vitamin). This can lead to skin and hair coat problems. Raw eggs may also contain Salmonella.

***Sugar Free foods with Xylitol: Veterinarians warn that a commonly used sweetener might cause liver failure in dogs, and perhaps even kill them. Researchers said for dogs, ingesting even a small amount of xylitol, found in many sugar-free foods, can trigger significant insulin release, which drops their blood sugar and can be fatal. Their report in the Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association appears to strengthen the suspected link between the sugar substitute xylitol, thought to make dogs sick, and possible liver failure. Xylitol, a naturally occurring product, is found in many sugar-free chewing gums, candies, baked goods and toothpastes. Researchers Sharon Gwaltney-Brant and Eric Dunayer with staff at a poison unit of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals in Urbana, Illinois, gathered information on eight dogs treated between 2003 and 2005 after eating products containing xylitol. Each dog became ill, and five died or had to be put down because of liver failure, possibly from ingesting xylitol. One dog who had to be euthanized had eaten four large, chocolate-frosted muffins containing about 1 pound of xylitol. "People don't think sugar-free gum can kill their dog. I didn't before I got into this. But this is something people should be aware of," Gwaltney-Brant, who co-authored the study with Dunayer, said in a statement. Gwaltney-Brant said for dogs, ingesting even a small amount of xylitol can trigger significant insulin release, which drops their blood sugar and can be fatal. "A 22-pound dog who consumes one gram of xylitol should be treated," she said, adding that further studies were needed to definitely establish a cause-and-effect relationship.

NOTE: Pets owners should not assume that human food is always safe for pets. When it comes to chocolate, onions, garlic, raisins/grapes and macadamia nuts, such foods should not be given at all. Be sure that your pets can’t get into your stash of chocolates, that food scraps are disposed of carefully to prevent onion and garlic toxicity and that your dog is prevented from picking up macadamia nuts if you have a tree in your garden.


This information came from the Animal Poison Control Center list of death and illness in pets.


In : Dog Health and Current News related topics 



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Breeder of Merit


Theresa Greetings from Northwestern Wisconsin! I am a wife, mother, breeder and author. I home school 1 of our daughters the others are now on there own. I also work with helping small businesses with their website needs. Previously, I had a 25 year banking career. Retired several years ago, as a Vice President of Commercial Banking and Business Development Director for a financial institution. I have owned and raised dogs and cats for over 40 years. In 2007, we started to show and raise Australian Terriers. We have 6 Australian Terriers and 2 Australian Shepherds. Breeder of Multiple Best in Show Aussies. We own and have bred some of the top Australian Terriers in the USA. We have bred and co-own the 16th and 17th Best in Show Australian Terrier in America he held the #1 in All-Breed in the USA in both 2013 and 2014. We have bred/own/handle the 2015 #1 Australian Terrier in the USA Jake who also won his first Best in Show with my 15 year old daughter Ellie handling him. Jake is only the 2nd "red" Australian Terrier to ever win a BIS. Breeder of 2 Australian Terriers to Win Best of Breed Westminster 2014 and 2015. We have Championed many Aussies and we have Champions in training, that being said, our dogs are first and foremost our companions. I take my role as a breeder very seriously. I support health testing and temperament testing as well as evaluating proper conformation prior to breeding. We believe in breeding for quality not quantity. We do not ship our puppies. Regardless of whether your puppy comes from us or not I hope you find our site a helpful resource. If you have questions about our program or about the Aussie Terrier, please e-mail me theresaagoiffon@msn.com or give me a call@ 715-689-2675. Thanks for visiting us! Blessings, Theresa