Aussie Talk

Australian Terrier Breed Standard

January 27, 2010

The Australian Terrier is small and sturdy with a blue and tan, sandy or red coat that is harsh in texture. They have a keen and alert expression and confident spirit. They are versatile in their work and living situations, making suitable companions in most environments.

General Appearance
A small, sturdy, medium-boned working terrier, rather long in proportion to height with pricked ears and docked tail. Blue and tan, solid sandy or solid red in color, with harsh-textured outer coat, a distinctive ruff and apron, and a soft, silky topknot. As befits their heritage as versatile workers, Australian Terriers are sound and free moving with good reach and drive. Their expression keen and intelligent; their manner spirited and self-assured.

The following description is that of the ideal Australian Terrier. Any deviation from this description must be penalized to the extent of the deviation.

Size, Proportion, Substance
Size - Height 10-11 inches at the withers. Deviation in either direction is to be discouraged. Proportion - The body is long in proportion to the height of the dog. The length of back from withers to the front of the tail is approximately 1-1½ inches longer than from withers to the ground. Substance - Good working condition, medium bone, correct body proportions, symmetry and balance determine proper weight.

Head
The head is long and strong. The length of the muzzle is equal to the length of the skull. Expression - Keen and intelligent. Eyes - Small, dark brown to black (the darker the better), keen in expression, set well apart. Rims are black, oval in shape. Faults: Light-colored or protruding eyes. Ears - Small, erect and pointed; set high on the skull yet well apart, carried erect without any tendency to flare obliquely off the skull. Skull - Viewed from the front or side is long and flat, slightly longer than it is wide and full between the eyes, with slight but definite stop. Muzzle - Strong and powerful with slight fill under the eyes. The jaws are powerful. Nose - Black. A desirable breed characteristic is an inverted V-shaped area free of hair extending from the nose up the bridge of the muzzle, varying in length in the mature dog. Lips - Tight and dark brown- or black-rimmed. Bite - Scissors with teeth of good size.

Neck, Topline, Body
Neck - Long, slightly arched and strong, blending smoothly into well laid back shoulders. Topline - Level and firm. Body - The body is of sturdy structure with ribs well-sprung but not rounded, forming a chest reaching slightly below the elbows with a distinct keel. The loin is strong and fairly short with slight tuck-up. Faults: Cobbiness, too long in loin. Tail - Set on high and carried erect at a twelve to one o'clock position, docked in balance with the overall dog leaving slightly less than one half, a good hand-hold when mature.

Forequarters
Shoulders - Long blades, well laid back with only slight space between the shoulder blades at the withers. The length of the upper arm is comparable to the length of the shoulder blade. The angle between the shoulder and the upper arm is 90 degrees. Faults: Straight, loose and loaded shoulders. Elbows - Close to the chest. Forelegs - Straight, parallel when viewed from the front; the bone is round and medium in size. They should be set well under the body, with definite body overhang (keel) before them when viewed from the side. Pasterns - Strong, with only slight slope. Fault: Down on pasterns. Dewclaws - Removed. Feet - Small, clean, catlike; toes arched and compact, nicely padded turning neither inward nor outward. Nails - Short, black and strong.

Hindquarters
Strong; legs well angulated at the stifles and hocks, short and perpendicular from the hocks to the ground. Upper and lower thighs are well muscled. Viewed from behind the rear legs are straight from the hip joints to the ground and in the same plane as the forelegs. Faults: Lack of muscular development or excessive muscularity. Feet - (See under Forequarters.)

Coat
Outer Coat - Harsh and straight; 2½ inches all over the body except the tail, pasterns, rear legs from the hocks down, and the feet which are kept free of long hair. Hair on the ears is kept very short. Undercoat - Short and soft. Furnishings - Softer than body coat. The neck is well furnished with hair, which forms a protective ruff blending into the apron. The forelegs are slightly feathered to the pasterns. Topknot - Covering only the top of the skull; of finer and softer texture than the rest of the coat.

Color and Markings
Colors: Blue and tan, solid sandy and solid red. Blue and tan - Blue: dark blue, steel-blue, dark gray-blue, or silver-blue. In silver-blues, each hair carries blue and silver alternating with the darker color at the tips. Tan markings (not sandy or red), as rich as possible, on face, ears, underbody, lower legs and feet, and around vent. The richer the color and more clearly defined the better. Topknot - Silver or a lighter shade than head color. Sandy or Red - Any shade of solid sandy or solid red, the clearer the better. Topknot - Silver or a lighter shade of body coat. Faults: All black body coat in the adult dog. Tan smut in the blue portion of the coat, or dark smut in sandy/red coated dogs. In any color, white markings on chest or feet are to be penalized.

Gait
As seen from the front and from the rear, the legs are straight from the shoulder and hip joints to the pads, and move in planes parallel to the centerline of travel. The rear legs move in the same planes as the front legs. As the dog moves at a faster trot, the front and rear legs and feet may tend to converge toward the centerline of travel, but the legs remain straight even as they flex or extend. Viewed from the side, the legs move in a ground-covering stride. The rear feet should meet the ground in the same prints as left by the front feet, with no gap between them. Topline remains firm and level, without bounce.

Temperament
The Australian Terrier is spirited, alert, courageous, and self-confident, with the natural aggressiveness of a ratter and hedge hunter; as a companion, friendly and affectionate. Faults: Shyness or aggressiveness toward people.

Approved August 9, 1988

 

Australian Terrier International

January 15, 2010

I am so pleased to announce a new Australian Terrier organization has been formed, www.australianterrierinternational.org for everyone interested in this wonderful breed.

The Australian Terrier International (ATI) was formed by Aussie people from all across the globe. 

The mission of the ATI is to "Encourage and educate others about this grand little breed.  To foster co-operation Internationally. Whether you own an Aussie OR are considering one, are interested in showing or breeding an Aussie...


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Integrity

January 11, 2010

Every year I look at the mission statement of Dunham Lake Aussies and make sure it still supports our goals which are to raise healthy, sound temperament Australian Terriers for show or companion homes.  2009 has been a wonderful and interesting year in many ways.  In the Aussie world in which we are involved, by our peers, we have been challenged, harrassed, loved, stalked, included, excluded, welcomed, ignored, highly encouraged, commended and supported. Quite the range of experiences! Than...


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January News

December 24, 2009

Happy New Year and Greetings Friends!

We’re looking forward to 2010! It’s already off to a great start here at Dunham Lake Aussies! 

A few plans for 2010…
 
Introducing several of our beautiful puppies to the show ring! Mentoring and assisting our wonderful new families adopting one of our puppies.
     Support and assist our club. Continue to volunteer and offer support to our local Humane Society and Aussie Rescue. Attend many dog shows including International shows. A...


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December News Merry Christmas!

December 2, 2009


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The Aussie Down Under-Book review!

November 30, 2009

As part of my youngest daughters 5th grade curriculum for history, she is studying the Eastern Hemisphere, which of course includes countries such as Asia, Antarctica, Russia, Africa, the Middle East, in addition to Australia, just to name a few.  It's been an interesting exploration for both of us. While we're not even mid-way through the year, we've had the pleasure of studying  many countries which included New Zealand and Australia. They are both wonderful and beautiful places which we pl...


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Don't feed me that!

November 20, 2009
During this time of year, Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, as we celebrate and feast on a variety of wonderful foods many, (guilty myself) tend to share a bit with our 4-legged friends.  While we think by giving our dogs "a special little treat" in celebration, it's really important for us to be reminded about what NOT to give them.

Here is something I pulled up on line that I thought would be a good reminder, some things like grapes and raisins, were new to me! If a grape of two roll off y...
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What's it like to show your dogs?

November 17, 2009

How'd you get started in showing dogs? What's it like to show dogs? I get asked these questions many times so let me tell you...

Our girls started showing our Aussies in 2007. We decided we have to start somewhere, so we jumped right into the ring (pretty much literally) and began showing our Aussies.  

Our first show was in St. Cloud MN, we didn't have any idea what we were doing. The girls wore tee-shirts with their dogs name on them and wore jeans (that's NOT how it's done :^). We thou...


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Dog Deaths and Blue Green Algae

November 16, 2009

My experience has been that the Australian Terrier breed LOVE to swim and they are good swimmers.  Ours jump off our dock, off the pontoon, are always with us in or around water catching frogs,  just playing in the water.  They love kiddie pools, even the sprinkler and fighting with the spraying hose.

Sadly, lake swimming is now something they won't be doing anymore.  This past July we lost our beloved Aussie Harley to Blue Green Algae poisoning.

Like most dogs, our dogs love to swim and catch ...


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Potty Training Your Aussie!

November 14, 2009

If you adopted a puppy from Dunham Lake Aussie's, your puppy began potty training at 6 weeks. By the time you receive your puppy from us at 12 weeks, he/she knows the concept, will go outside, but still has a month or so of consistent training on your part as well as maturing physically to be fully trained. Here are some tips on how to help you complete the training the training process.

The Australian Terriers we have raised and bred were easy to train  That's because we spend hours a day ...


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Breeder of Merit


Theresa Greetings from Northwestern Wisconsin! I am a wife, mother, breeder and author. I home school 1 of our daughters the others are now on there own. I also work with helping small businesses with their website needs. Previously, I had a 25 year banking career. Retired several years ago, as a Vice President of Commercial Banking and Business Development Director for a financial institution. I have owned and raised dogs and cats for over 40 years. In 2007, we started to show and raise Australian Terriers. We have 6 Australian Terriers and 2 Australian Shepherds. Breeder of Multiple Best in Show Aussies. We own and have bred some of the top Australian Terriers in the USA. We have bred and co-own the 16th and 17th Best in Show Australian Terrier in America he held the #1 in All-Breed in the USA in both 2013 and 2014. We have bred/own/handle the 2015 #1 Australian Terrier in the USA Jake who also won his first Best in Show with my 15 year old daughter Ellie handling him. Jake is only the 2nd "red" Australian Terrier to ever win a BIS. Breeder of 2 Australian Terriers to Win Best of Breed Westminster 2014 and 2015. We have Championed many Aussies and we have Champions in training, that being said, our dogs are first and foremost our companions. I take my role as a breeder very seriously. I support health testing and temperament testing as well as evaluating proper conformation prior to breeding. We believe in breeding for quality not quantity. We do not ship our puppies. Regardless of whether your puppy comes from us or not I hope you find our site a helpful resource. If you have questions about our program or about the Aussie Terrier, please e-mail me theresaagoiffon@msn.com or give me a call@ 715-689-2675. Thanks for visiting us! Blessings, Theresa